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I would like to compare through and to. What is their difference in meaning? Which one is (more) correct (or are both correct)? The context can be found in the two sentences below.

  • Julie went to school from September through June.
  • Julie went to school from September to June.

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Both are correct. The first (with "through") suggests that the school year ends at the end of June, whereas the second s(with "to") suggests that the school year ends sometime during the month of June.

However, in casual speech, the first might be understood the same as the second. To be perfectly understood, specify the day of the month:

  • Julie went to school from September 4 {to/through} June 12.

In that case, "to " and "through" might both be understood as meaning that June 12 was the last day of school.

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Both of them are correct; "to" and "through" are both prepositions. Using "through" in that context makes it mean up to and including. Using "to" in that same context makes "to" express a point reached after a period of time. ("to" can also express a point reached at the end of a range, i.e The worth of the product went from 10 dollars to 20 dollars. (Keep in mind, for that kind of sentence you can't use "through".)

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