1

There's a meaning of come out meaning that someone says whether they agree/disagree with something publicly. There're a couple of examples:

  • He came out against the plan.

  • In her speech, the senator came out in favour of a change in the law.

My question is whether we can use the phrasal when we're talking about ourselves. For instance, I'm at the meeting where we discussing some techincal topics and I want to disagree with a way my colleague proposed publicly. Can I say something like

I would come out against it.

Is that grammatically correct?

  • It's grammatically correct, but I'll think that you are going to expose something (by saying something against it) in the public or to people outside that meeting, maybe the board or the shareholders (say, in a shareholder meeting). – Damkerng T. Jul 5 '15 at 9:36
  • @DamkerngT. So it's reasonble to ask how you personally would say that. – Dmitrii Bundin Jul 5 '15 at 9:43
  • @DamkerngT. We probably shouldn't ever use the come out... Maybe something like I don't agree with you be much better here? – Dmitrii Bundin Jul 5 '15 at 9:44
  • 1
    Yes, it should work. If I want to emphasize my disagreement in a meeting when it's clear that the majority is going accept the idea, I may say, For the record, I disagree with this idea. – Damkerng T. Jul 5 '15 at 9:51
  • 3
    I would come out against it means "(Be forewarned,) I will make my opposition to this idea known publicly." – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jul 5 '15 at 17:27
1

The connotation that goes along with "come out" is a bit finer than just saying that you disagree or agree with something. It is more as "take a stance" on something. The difference here is that you can only really "take a stance" once - the first time you make your opinion clearly known.

To make this clearer, let me give you an example. When President Obama gives his speeches, he is not "coming out" for or against each issue that he talks about every time he talks about it. When he recently gave a speech applauding the Supreme Court's decision legalizing gay marriage, it wouldn't be right to say that he "came out" in support of gay marriage, because he has been supporting it for the last 4 years.

However, the first time that President Obama spoke on this issue and took a position, it would be correct to say that he "came out" in support of gay marriage.

Now, back to your question:

I'm at the meeting where we discussing some techincal topics and I want to disagree with a way my colleague proposed publicly. Can I say something like

I would come out against it.

Is that grammatically correct?

Because you'll making your opinion publicly know clearly for the first time, it is fine to say that you would come out against it.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.