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In grammar, may you get to place em-dashes former to placing parenthesis?

The tired, hungry — (and probably unfriendly) — lion roared.

And which sentence contains all right punctuation?

The tired, hungry—and probably unfriendly—lion roared.

The tired, hungry, (and probably unfriendly) lion roared.

The tired, hungry, (and probably unfriendly), lion roared.

The tired, hungry, and probably unfriendly lion roared.

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    Don't use commas with parens. So: The tired, hungry (and probably unfriendly) lion roard. As for which is "correct," there's not just one way to do this.
    – J.R.
    Jul 6 '15 at 1:05
  • So it seems you may mostly get to utilize any. And you may not get to utilize The tired, hungry, (and probably unfriendly) lion roared. or The tired, hungry, (and probably unfriendly), lion roared.. I thank you, J.R.♦.
    – saySay
    Jul 6 '15 at 3:30
  • Well, yes, but using both em-dashes and parentheses is overkill. Use one or the other, but not both. So for your first example & question the answer is no. Jul 6 '15 at 7:09
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    em-dashes are used to set the parenthetic remark off in lieu of parentheses and commas. Note: the parenthetic clause or phrase, if removed, should yield a grammatical sentence that "stands on its own". Jul 6 '15 at 11:15
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I would vote for the first one. If it helps, try visualizing the sentence with the emphasized or parenthesized phrase deleted. In which case:

The tired, hungry lion roared. <-- Looks OK.

The tired, hungry, lion roared. <-- That comma after hungry is looking unnatural.

The tired, hungry, , lion roared. <-- Sequential commas. Shudder

The tired, hungry, and probably unfriendly lion roared. <-- This one looks good, and would also be my choice if I were to avoid em-dashes.

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