1

Here's the context:

A friend of mine is working at a company A and another company, B, is offering him a job in their company with a high salary. So, he is thinking of changing his company. And I'd like to introduce a person working in the company B.

  1. I have a friend working at the same company as the company that you are thinking of moving to.

  2. I have a friend working at the same company that you are thinking of moving to.

  3. I have a friend working at the same company as you are thinking of moving to.

I think #1 is the most basic sentence (grammatically correct) and the other ones depend on preference. So I think I can use whichever I want. Am I right to think this way? In addition, I'm not sure if it is correct use 'move to another company' in this context?

  • Have a look at your dictionary, entry same – rogermue Jul 7 '15 at 17:35
  • @rogermue I can't guess what, in the dictionary definition of "same", you think will answer this question. It might be better if you spelled it out in an answer, or rewrote your comment to be clearer. – Dan Getz Jul 7 '15 at 18:00
  • 1
    @rogermue yes, that's certainly a dictionary. But what there answers this question? – Dan Getz Jul 7 '15 at 21:21
1

Option #1

This is acceptable, but rather wordy, and so would not be favoured.

Option #2

This is the best choice. The sentence flows nicely and makes perfect sense.

Option #3

This is unacceptable, due to the improper usage of the word as.

Additional

Moving is correct in this context, but you could replace it with 'taking up a job with', if you wished. For example:

I am taking up a job with Google next week

Instead of:

I am moving to Google next week

0

Option #2 would be the best candidate.

I have a friend working at the same company that you are thinking of moving to.

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