-1

I know the sentence below is incorrect , but would you please correct me? By this I mean the expression is not workable for the formula, so we must use it in another equations, not formula.

'This algebraic expression above is not satisfy for the following formula.'

Many thanks all

closed as off-topic by ColleenV, Nathan Tuggy, user3169, pyobum, Lucky Jul 9 '15 at 10:15

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Proofreading questions are off-topic unless a specific source of concern in the text is clearly identified. See: Alternative websites for proofreading" – ColleenV, Nathan Tuggy, user3169, pyobum, Lucky
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 2
    You've got two answers, but by now you ought to know that if we are looking for error(s) in a sentence you should point us towards your major suspect(s) and tell us your reasons for suspicion. It's not too much to ask really :-) just a line or two about your own thoughts. – Lucky Jul 9 '15 at 10:15
3

The big problem is that you're trying to use "is" (the "being" verb) to attribute something with a verb instead of an adjective. You can use "does," as in @TzD's example, to make that connection appropriately, or you can change "satisfy" to an adjective:

'This algebraic expression above is not satisfactory for the following formula.'

"This algebraic expression above" is also close, but still incorrect. You can say "the above algebraic expression" or "the algebraic expression above." You could also just say "this algebraic expression" without "above" if you are confident the reader will know which expression you are talking about.

  • 'The algebraic expression above is not satisfactory for the following formula.' I agree that this is grammatically correct, and has a useful meaning. To my ear, the meaning it carries is less precise than "The algebraic expression does not satisfy the following formula. The latter (with satisfy as a verb) means specifically that substituting the expression into the formula above will not result in a true statement. e.g. X=Sqrt(5) does not satisfy the formula 2x = 5 The adjective, satisfactory, may just mean that you don't like the result. – Adam Jul 8 '15 at 21:47
  • "Fulfilling all demands or requirements," as in the definition at dictionary.reference.com, is generally the definition I use for "satisfactory." Therefore it's an adjective that doesn't describe whether or not I like it; instead it describes whether or not the thing in question does what it's supposed to do. I try to use words more precisely than most, though. – Crazy Eyes Jul 9 '15 at 14:36
  • "All demands or requirements" - to me this would include demands and requirements outside of mathematical constraints. The algebraic expression in might result in a valid mathematical statement that indicates your business will be bankrupt or your dog will die. To me, those would be "unsatisfactory" results, even if the equation has been satisfied. Using words precisely is tricky in math. Just because I have grouped three things does not mean I have a group, just as satisfying an equation does not mean I will find it satisfactory. (Or even that I will be satisfied.) – Adam Jul 9 '15 at 15:41
1

'This algebraic expression above is not satisfy for the following formula.'

You can write it like this:-

The algebraic expression above does not satisfy the following formula.

or

The above algebraic expression does not satisfy the following formula.

The problem of the sentence I think the be verb 'is'.

  • Thanks. However, I cannot observe any example by googling the examples you have provided or even mine. – nima Jul 8 '15 at 18:39
  • 1
    I basically agree with TzD's answer, though I prefer "The algebraic expression above does not satisfy the following equation" You may not find the exact language of either mine or his by googling, because they are wordy, specific phrases. Try googling "satisfies the formula" or "satisfies the equation:" google.com/search?q=satisfies+the+equation" You will get millions of hits. The opposite of "satisfies" is "does not satisfy," which matches what @TzD proposed. – Adam Jul 8 '15 at 20:43

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.