0

What is the difference between the two words: Indiscipline and Undiscipline?

Is seems both are having the same meaning. Can you explain the difference between the two by using them in sentences.

  • 1
    I doubt Indiscipline is commonly used at all. You should add some example sentences to your question. It is possible there is a better way to say it. – user3169 Jul 8 '15 at 18:06
5

They are both nouns and both mean a lack of discipline. However, the word undiscipline is far less common than indiscipline. The latter can be found in most dictionaries, while most dictionaries will not contain undiscipline.

Far more common is the use of undisciplined as an adjective. Though even in this context it would probably be more idiomatic to use a negation of the word disciplined instead, compare:

  • He is rather undisciplined.
  • He is not very disciplined.
| improve this answer | |
0

From Oxford and Cambridge dictionaries, there is no adjective indisciplined. I've just heard ex-Labour UK politician Ed Balls use indisciplined in a live election discussion, late 2019 (to describe PM Boris Johnson). The word appears in the Free Dictionary online, but as an adjective, Cambridge and Oxford only list undisciplined.

As for nouns, neither Oxford nor Cambridge list undiscipline. Personally, despite the answer above saying it's an uncommon word, I have never come across such a word, undiscipline.

So according to these two fairly authoritative dictionaries the only words there are indiscipline and undisciplined.

However, Chambers is also amongst the authoritative dictionaries, and it lists the alternate adjective to undisciplined, indisciplined (dating from 18th Century), but unsurprisingly to me, along with Oxford and Cambridge dictionaries, doesn't recognise undiscipline.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.