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I wrote this sentence in an article (scientific)

In order to force the students to rely on their phonics knowledge, instead of depending on their memory, to do the tests, the teacher can add some unfamiliar words, which are not usually shown on the textbooks, to the list.

Is it considered a long sentence for a scientific article? Or for a native speaker, Or in any aspect you may consider.

If you feel the question is for proofreading my main question is below:

I feel there is a gap between "add some .." and "to the list". To resolve it, could I say

... the teacher can add some unfamiliar words to the list, which are not usually shown on the textbooks.

Or maybe better

... the teacher can add to the list some unfamiliar words, which are not usually shown on the textbooks.

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    I do not understand your question. What do you mean with "does this sentence count long"?
    – oerkelens
    Jul 10 '15 at 13:40
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    When testing, the teacher can add unfamiliar words to force the students to rely on their knowledge of phonics rather than their memory of individual words. Jul 10 '15 at 13:43
  • @oerkelens I edited my question, long to a, say, native speaker, or in an article
    – Ahmad
    Jul 10 '15 at 13:45
  • It isn't the length as much as the optimal location of clauses and the elimination of unnecessary verbiage that one should be concerned about. Jul 10 '15 at 13:47
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    I think I understand the question better after your edit, but count long is not grammatical. I guess you mean to ask is this considered a long sentence or would a native speaker consider this sentence (too) long.
    – oerkelens
    Jul 10 '15 at 14:04
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It's not too long, if that's what you mean, but you have too many commas and a couple of redundant words:

In order to force the students to rely on their phonics knowledge instead of their memory to do the tests, the teacher can add some unfamiliar words which are not usually shown in the textbooks.

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  • +1 for eliminating the unneeded "instead of depending on" Jul 10 '15 at 13:45
  • Thank you, In your version you omitted "to the list", but the way I used it I think I had to put "which are not usually shown in the textbooks" between a comma pair. Right?
    – Ahmad
    Jul 10 '15 at 14:13
  • Well, if by 'to the list' you mean 'to the test', then I think that's implied by he context. You could also say '..the teacher can add to them some unfamiliar words which are not...'
    – Steve Ives
    Jul 10 '15 at 19:44

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