0

We can use the phrasal in the sense of becoming known, that's clear. So, I decided to make a couple of sentences with that phrasal to get a better understanding of how I could use it. Here they are:

  • The fact that they were going to get married came out last month

  • It should have been come out before we bought the tickets that the country we
    were going to travel to revoked no visa requirements.

  • It's not come out yet that the company stop seling the product, but the majority's already guessing about that.

I'm not sure if the sentences sound natural, espcially the third one. Do we use come out in that meaning with negatives?

2

I'm afraid that you got the meaning of "to come out" slightly wrong. Yes, it means to become known, but with the implicit notion that the information was intended to be kept secret or at least unknown before.

That's why "a coming out" is used for admitting / declaring / making public a previously hidden sexual orientation (e.g. homosexuality).

So your first example is correct if the couple's intention to marry was a secret that leaked out somehow. The other two are not idiomatic.

  • In the socend sentence I meant that they didn't declare the information publicly when it had been already decided, they did it later instead. So we we're counting on getting visa by arrival, but it has become imposilbe since it came out. – Dmitrii Bundin Jul 11 '15 at 10:39
  • @DmitryBundin So you mean something like "Unfortunately the new visa restrictions came out only after we had bought the tickets." With "come out"="be published". – Stephie Jul 11 '15 at 10:43
  • Yes, but didn't explain it correctly as I've already learnt... BTW, the verb come out is intransitive in that meaning, ins't? – Dmitrii Bundin Jul 11 '15 at 10:49
  • @DmitryBundin Correct. – Stephie Jul 11 '15 at 11:04
3

The first one is OK.

The second does not work. Some variations are:

It should have come out before we bought the tickets ...

It should have been revealed before we bought the tickets ...

The third sentence could be improved, perhaps as:

It has not come out yet that the company stopped selling the product, but the majority [of their customers] are already guessing that.


In response to the question of how would I say these sentences, here are some possibilities.

I only learnt last month that they were going to get married.

Their engagement [to get married] was only revealed last month.

News about their forthcoming marriage [only] came out last month.

For the visa sentence it depends on who should have revealed or found the information.

Before we bought the tickets the travel agent should have explained the revocation of the no visa requirements.

Before we bought the tickets we should have found out about the revocation of the no visa requirements.

The revocation of the no visa requirements should have been explained [to us] before we bought the tickets.

We should have investigated the visa requirements more carefully before we travelled.

When writing I prefer to not use apostrophes for contractions. That may derive from my school days, but I think they can make it harder to understand the written text.

It has not come out yet that the company have stopped selling the product, but the majority of the customers have already guessed that that is the case.

The majority of the customers have already guessed that the company have stopped selling the product even though there is no official statement.

  • BTW, how would you personaly say it? – Dmitrii Bundin Jul 11 '15 at 10:40

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.