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Sometimes when I relate some sentences with conjunctions I don't know if

  • I should repeat the subject in the second sentence?
  • I should repeat an auxiliary verb?
  • I can use a verb which maybe is not in agreement with the first one?

For example :

The user can click on the “Show the letter” button to see the correct letter and [then] (continue or continues ?) with the rest of the word.

This technique helps the student to discover his common mistakes and (improve or improves or to improve ..?) his skill in discriminating speech sounds.

What is the general rule?

1 Answer 1

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In the first sentence, the form of the verb in the second clause is still governed by "can" so it is plain in form: [can click and continue]

The user can click on the “Show the letter” button to see the correct letter and then continue with the rest of the word.

In the second, both verbs are governed by helps: [helps him detect and improve]

This technique helps the student detect his common mistakes and improve his ability to distinguish speech sounds.

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  • Then if it was "to detect" then the second was "to improve" too?
    – Ahmad
    Commented Jul 12, 2015 at 12:44
  • if you used TO, you could use it once or repeat it: [helps him to detect x and improve y] -or- [helps him to detect x and to improve y].
    – CocoPop
    Commented Jul 12, 2015 at 12:48
  • I mean in general not just for the verb "help", for example can I say "allows him to detect X and improve Y"?
    – Ahmad
    Commented Jul 12, 2015 at 12:55
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    yes, i was just using your example. To answer your questions, TO can govern more than one verb: "I want, hope, have, refuse TO LIVE in this country and (TO) WORK for this company."
    – CocoPop
    Commented Jul 12, 2015 at 12:57

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