2

Can we omit "at that contract" at the end of the following sentence?

I was signed to a contract at Disney for $75 a week but lasted only 18 months [at that contract].

4
  • "...but lasted" suggests that you could no longer stomach working there. "...but it lasted..." on the other hand means the contract term was 18 months.
    – TimR
    Commented Jul 13, 2015 at 13:09
  • @TRomano Thank you for the clarification. I was thinking about the phrase (at that contract). Can I omit it or not?
    – Roy
    Commented Jul 13, 2015 at 15:44
  • If you leave it off or don't leave it off, your sentence suggests that you were signed to a contract by Disney but terminated the contract early, possibly in breach of its terms. Leaving it off does not change the meaning.
    – TimR
    Commented Jul 13, 2015 at 17:59
  • Thank you so much @TRomano. I got what I was looking for :)
    – Roy
    Commented Jul 14, 2015 at 4:33

1 Answer 1

1

The second phrase does not have a subject, so you would expect it to be the same as in the first phrase, "I". So:

I was signed to a contract at Disney for $75 a week but I lasted only 18 months.

But it could also mean:

I was signed to a contract at Disney for $75 a week but it lasted only 18 months.

Here it means the contract, which is the meaning you intended with [at that contract].

But because the subject in each phrase is different, it is better to have a subject in both phrases to avoid confusion.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .