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Can we omit "at that contract" at the end of the following sentence?

I was signed to a contract at Disney for $75 a week but lasted only 18 months [at that contract].

  • "...but lasted" suggests that you could no longer stomach working there. "...but it lasted..." on the other hand means the contract term was 18 months. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jul 13 '15 at 13:09
  • @TRomano Thank you for the clarification. I was thinking about the phrase (at that contract). Can I omit it or not? – Roy Jul 13 '15 at 15:44
  • If you leave it off or don't leave it off, your sentence suggests that you were signed to a contract by Disney but terminated the contract early, possibly in breach of its terms. Leaving it off does not change the meaning. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jul 13 '15 at 17:59
  • Thank you so much @TRomano. I got what I was looking for :) – Roy Jul 14 '15 at 4:33
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The second phrase does not have a subject, so you would expect it to be the same as in the first phrase, "I". So:

I was signed to a contract at Disney for $75 a week but I lasted only 18 months.

But it could also mean:

I was signed to a contract at Disney for $75 a week but it lasted only 18 months.

Here it means the contract, which is the meaning you intended with [at that contract].

But because the subject in each phrase is different, it is better to have a subject in both phrases to avoid confusion.

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