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I read the following "anyone and everyone" sentences but I don't understand why anyone and everyone are used together. Hope anyone can clarify for me. Thanks.

Everyone knows they love to talk on the phone to anyone and everyone.

Anyone and everyone is to speak to you on the phone.

You will speak to anyone and everyone who might list.

migrated from english.stackexchange.com Jul 13 '15 at 12:35

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    It is used for emphasis, and that is all there is to it. – ЯegDwight Jul 13 '15 at 12:35
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Anyone and everyone is an exaggeration which indicates that no matter who it is they qualify.

For your first example the person stating that is simply saying that "they" will talk to anyone who can be bothered to listen. It doesn't matter if they're complete strangers, in the middle of something important, or a telemarketer. If they're on the phone this person will talk to them.

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The second and third sentences aren't good examples. I don't think anyone would use the phrase like that.

In the first sentence, it can be interpreted fairly literally. "Everyone knows they love to talk on the phone to anyone and everyone." Anyone because it doesn't matter if it's the president or a McDonald's worker. Everyone because they aren't just willing to talk to anyone, but they will talk to everyone (an exaggeration).

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