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Here's the context.

We had been dating for more than a year until we broke up a month ago. I' okay now.

  1. However, the very first few days that I spent alone without her, it (seemed / was) like something I could never overcome.

  2. However, the very first few days that I spent alone without her, it seemed almost impossible to get over her and become (well off / okay / good)

Q1. which one is natural among the words in the bracket.

Q2. in the #1, I tried to make 'it' and 'the very fist few days' equal, whereas In the #2, 'it' represents 'to get over~~',did I do well?

Q3. Here we can not remove 'the' from 'the very first few days' because it's definite time, right?

  • Carefull: "Well-off" might be understood as "rich"... – Stephie Jul 15 '15 at 7:45
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which one is natural among the words in the bracket.

To seem means "to appear to be" or "to give the impression of being" - something you think might be true, or probably might be true, but you can't prove it yet. If this is what you mean, then use seem. If something is true in fact, or able to be directly observed, seem should not be used.

in the #1, I tried to make 'it' and 'the very fist few days' equal, whereas In the #2, 'it' represents 'to get over~~',did I do well?

Yep. It can be used in a provisional sense. Also, you could be expressing an impersonal verb here, which is a situation where you are saying how things are in general without really attaching it to a specific subject. Either use of it fits here and is valid.

Here we can not remove 'the' from 'the very first few days' because it's definite time, right?

Right. You use the because you are not talking about any "first few days" but a specific "first few days" - the the is also a signal that you mean days as a singular item and not as a plural collection of days.

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