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Is "him" required in the following sentence? Little confused.

He became, as the Guinness Book of World Records called him, "the most perfectly developed man in the history of the world."

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    Why do you think it's not OK?
    – Catija
    Jul 15 '15 at 21:44
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It's entirely okay, grammatically, to repeat the pronoun there, and in fact given the rest of the sentence it's required: the only way to avoid he+him is to rephrase to avoid "called". CopperKettle has given some good alternatives, although I don't think rephrasing is necessary in this case; there's little awkwardness when repeating pronouns, especially if it's not exactly the same one.

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He became, as the Guinness Book of World Records called him, "the most perfectly developed man in the history of the world."

If you suspect that the repetition of the pronoun is jarring a bit, you might remodel the sentence slightly:

He became, in the words used by the Guinnes Book of World Records, "the most perfectly developed man in the history of the world."

or:

He became, according to the Guinnes Book of World Records, "the most perfectly developed man in the history of the world."

Alternatively, to keep most of the original sentence intact

"He became, as the Guiness Book of World Records put it, "the most perfectly developed man in the history of the world." (all kudos to Au101)

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    +1. Alternatively, to keep most of the original sentence intact, "He became, as the Guiness Book of World Records put it, ..."
    – Au101
    Jul 15 '15 at 17:14
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    Thank you so much @CopperKettle for the help. Quite interesting explanation. Is it okay if I keep the sentence same called him?
    – Roy
    Jul 15 '15 at 18:19
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    In my opinion @CopperKettle provides you with a number of nice alternatives that one might prefer. But I think your original sentence with "called him" is absolutely fine, even if it may not be the most elegant way possible of expressing this idea. Is it okay to repeat the pronoun? Yes, absolutely. I see no problem here - certainly not in the general case. Although it's possible that this specific sentence could be rewritten in a nicer way.
    – Au101
    Jul 15 '15 at 19:15
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    @Au101: well, that's grammatical. But what it means is that at the very moment Guinness called, he became "the most perfectly developed man". A far less likely thing to want to say, especially with the snigger quotes there. The real sentence wants to use the transitive verb "called", meaning to use a name or description for something, not the intransitive version (perhaps to do with telephones or visiting a house). That's what "him" is needed for, the transitive version of the verb needs an object. Jul 15 '15 at 20:56
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    There is a very slight nuance of meaning that isn't carried through to your "according to..." alternative sentence. In the original sentence, the implied meaning is that the speaker holds the same opinion of him as does the Guinness Book of World Records. In this alternative sentence, the speaker merely reports what GBWR says, regardless of whether he/she agrees. (And in fact, this structure sometimes indicates some level of disagreement.) Jul 15 '15 at 21:36

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