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From a news report on Science Daily:

"Evidence-based trauma-focused psychotherapies require that patients experience and then master anxiety," Dr. Guina and colleagues write. "Benzodiazepines can impair that experience by numbing emotions, decreasing learning efficiency, and inhibiting memory processing of material learned in therapy."

Can we use this instead of that:

"Evidence-based trauma-focused psychotherapies require that patients experience and then master anxiety," Dr. Guina and colleagues write. "Benzodiazepines can impair this experience by numbing emotions, decreasing learning efficiency, and inhibiting memory processing of material learned in therapy."

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I find no problem in using whatsoever -this or that especially in the very next sentence, and when there's only one experience have been just defined.

There are very less chances that we think of 'some other' experience if we read 'this' instead of 'that' or vice versa.


However, looking at the original source, I'm curious to know who spoke this sentence: "Benzodiazepines can impair that experience by numbing emotions, decreasing learning efficiency, and inhibiting memory processing of material learned in therapy."

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    Jeffrey Guina, Sarah R. Rossetter, Bethany J. Derhodes, Ramzi W. Nahhas, Randon S. Welton. Benzodiazepines for PTSD. Journal of Psychiatric Practice, 2015; 21 (4): 281 DOI: 10.1097/PRA.0000000000000091
    – PerryW
    Jul 17 '15 at 5:58
  • You still din' get my point @PerryW check the source...the 'quoted' sentence comes from nowhere. The previous sentence finishes with doctor and his colleagues 'write'. And the sentence is concerned is 'left alone' with no additional information. And I know the original source.
    – Maulik V
    Jul 17 '15 at 6:08
  • At first I thought it was a bit of what we used to call creative paraphrasing but it is a direct quote from Benzodiazepines for PTSD: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis - Guina et-al 2015. I've just read it here journals.lww.com/practicalpsychiatry/Fulltext/2015/07000/… a page search on 'numbing emotions" will take you straight to it
    – PerryW
    Jul 17 '15 at 6:25
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    @MaulikV [ "You're dirty," he said. "You ought to wash. Where did you go and what did you do? Tell me everything at once." ] Who would you think said "You ought to wash. ... Tell me everything at once."? Jul 17 '15 at 6:31
  • @DamkerngT. in the original source... 'they concluded' or 'they added' would have worked. In your created example, I can add it!---> "You're dirty," he said. "You ought to wash. Where did you go and what did you do? Tell me everything at once," said her mother agreeing him.
    – Maulik V
    Jul 17 '15 at 9:50
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There's enough slop in the way the demonstratives are commonly used to allow use of either there, but since the sentence refers "at arms-length" to trauma-focused psychotherapies, "that" is better, IMO, than "this". "That" conveys slightly better the idea that the authors are "objectively distanced" rather than personally invested in those (these?) modalities.

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