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The following quotation is from Anthony Trollope's The Small House at Allington:

But it seems as though she will be so far separated from us. It is not the distance, but the manner of life which makes the separation. I hope you'll never be taken so far from me.

The expressions it seems and as though both indicate or give the impression of something that is uncertain, irreal or hypothetical, that is, is not palpable or tangible.

On the other hand will indicates a strong likelihood or certainty, yet they are coupled together.

The whole thing puzzles me, I just can't understand the way they are doing properly their jobs in the sentence in question.

If I were to write that sentence I would probably use would instead of will but I'm not sure of both the author's reasons and if my suggestion might be correct.

Would you please throw some light on this so as to help me understand it?

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I would probably use 'would' in a sentence like that if I was discussing something that might or might not happen:

If she goes, it seems as though she would be so far separated from us.

On the other hand, I would be more likely to use the author's construction if it was something that was definitely going to happen, and I was talking about what I thought the result would be:

When she goes, it seems as though she will be so far separated from us.

The use of 'will' indicates that the event is certain to happen, while the weaker 'it seems as though' indicate that the results of that event are subjective and/or uncertain.

It's also worth noting that 'will' does not have to imply a strong certainty. It indicates that the speaker/author has no reason to signal uncertainty, but it's a default option as much as a positive signal. If a positive indication of certainty is needed, most people will add an extra modifier such as 'will definitely' or 'will obviously'.

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But it seems as though she will be so far separated from us. It is not the distance, but the manner of life which makes the separation. I hope you'll never be taken so far from me.

It seems...

It feels (to me)... or It appears (to me)...

...as though she will be so far separated from us.

as if she is going to be separated from us by a great distance.

The "as though" is an acknowledgement (like "as if") that the separation is not literally by a great distance. It is the "manner of life" that will separate them.

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The word will in this sentence simply indicates future tense, not certainty. The sentence is saying that it seems likely or possible that something will happen sometime in the future.

For example, if I see you packing your bags, I might say, "It seems as though you will be going on a trip." I don't know for sure, but it seems probable. And you're not on the trip yet -- I'm just guessing that you will go.

Consider these additional examples where will doesn't indicate certainty:

I doubt I will go to the lake tomorrow.

I don't think he will ever walk again.

Do you think I will win the lottery?

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