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Is it correct to say

We will need a car because we are taking the plane. (tickets have been bought and we are leaving in 2 weeks)

or is it better

We will need a car because we go by plane.(same condition as the first sentence

If both are correct let me know the best sentence.

I myself think the first one is better because it has been planned so progressive is better . I think my second sentence is not good I should have written" we will need a car because we will go by plane"

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    What are your own thoughts about this? Wich sentence is better in your opinion, and why? StackExchange is not a homework help site, show some effort. (0: – CowperKettle Jul 20 '15 at 17:12
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    I think the first one is better because it has been planned so progressive is better . I think my second sentence is not good I should have written" we will need a car because we will go by plane" – user5577 Jul 20 '15 at 17:19
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As a native US English speaker, the second sentence sounds awkward to me. I would say

We will need a car because we are going by plane.

The first sentence sounds fine; another way I might say it is

We will need a car because we are flying.

(if I'm talking about a trip with someone and the obvious choice is drive or fly, as is often the case in the US.)

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  1. We will need a car because we are taking the plane.

— with this sentence, we are describing a pre-planned activity that is imminent.

  1. We will need a car because we go by plane.

— with this sentence, we are describing an activity that has most likely been scheduled. The use of the Present Simple renders this event more "definite" and "immutable". For instance, if we go by plane somewhere each month in accordance with a strict timetable, we would be more likely to use sentence 2.

This is why sentence 1 is probably a more natural choice, unless there is indeed a rigid timetable for their flight(s).


According to Quirk et al.'s "Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language", unit 4.45, we use the Present Simple to represent

"a marked future of unusual defineteness, attributing to the future the degree of certainty one normally associates with the present and the past."

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