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1.I will study hard until I get a high score on this exam.

2.I will study hard until I've gotten a high score on this exam.

I think these sentences are grammatically correct. but if I add a specific time, I think these sentences have to be only this one:

3.I will study hard until I get a high score on this exam on July 25th.

And how about these?

a. I'd like to watch all of the holocaust movies present in the world until I've become an expert on it.

b. I'd like to watch all of the holocaust movies present in the world until I become an expert on it.

Since there's no a word representing a specific time, both of them are okay, right?

And what I'd like to know is the difference between "have gotten" and "get". What I know about them is we can use "future perfect" to refer to unspecific future event that might happen before some accident. but "get" refers to future event that could be either a specific scheduled event or unspecific future event. that's why if I add a specific time mentioning, I have to use "get".

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    Shouldn't your question title be "until + perfect preset / present"? – JMB Jul 24 '15 at 19:16
  • Your very first sentence is the only actually not weird one. – M.A.R. ಠ_ಠ Jul 24 '15 at 19:39
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Both the sententence are grammatically correct.

The word until is used as a preposition and conjunction

When you use it as a conjunction, it means "up to the time that". You usually use the present simple in the until-clause, but it's possible to use the present perfect, without any change in meaning. If there is any subtle difference, that is in regard to the degree of emphasis.

Your second sentence with the present perfect in the until-clause puts more emphasis on the completion of the action in the until-clause.

The OP is right that both the present simple and the present perfect in the until-clause are indicative of actions or events in the future.

  • I concur; I made a mistake in my reasoning. Thus, I deleted my answer. – M.A.R. ಠ_ಠ Jul 25 '15 at 9:49
  • 1. I will study hard until I get a high score on this exam on July 25th 2. I will study hard until I've gotten a high score on this exam on July 25th . Then, here, both of them can be used. there's no difference in specific date, I mean I thought it's only present tense that I can use with a specific date – jihoon Jul 25 '15 at 10:46

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