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Here's the question that I uploaded yesterday. And I'd like to know if I understand right after reading the answers.

A girl talked to John yesterday.

I met a girl in the library today.

The two girls are the same person.

  1. The girl who talked to John yesterday is the same person as the one that I met in the library today.
  2. I met the same girl in the library as the one who talked to John yesterday.
  3. The same girl as the one who talked to John yesterday is the person that I met in the library today.

Here, these 3 sentences are too wordy for anyone to use in real life. And after checking into the answers, I've corrected in a way that I think they are all right.

  1. The girl who talked to John yesterday is the same person (as or that or who) I met in the library today.
  2. I met the same girl in the library (as or who or that) talked to John yesterday.
  3. The same girl (as or who or that) talked to John yesterday is the person that I met in the library today.

I think we use 'that' or 'who(m)' here to modify a noun 'girl' , but when it comes to a situation where we use an adjective 'same', we can also use 'as' because the basic form is like this : the same one as the one (who / that). we don't use this form because it is too wordy to use though. So, I think 'the same (noun)' can be modified by using***'as'***, 'that', 'who(m)'..., while just a noun can not be modified by using 'as'

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I'm inferring that you want to know whether your three reformulated statements are grammatically correct and semantically equivalent to their respective longer forms. Yes, your reasoning is good, The three reformulated sentence are correct, except that in #1, the choices should be (as or that or whom), because she is the object of "met".

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