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From an essay I'm writing:

The words demoniacal corpse, suggest that the creature is unnatural and unhuman. It creates an image of an evil monster, existing only to cause misery to mankind, which is quite the opposite of what the creature intends to do.

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    Maybe it's just an error? Shouldn't it read "The words 'demoniacal corpse' suggest that the creature is unnatural and unhuman"? Commented Jul 27, 2015 at 1:10
  • i meant the next part. I didnt mean to put one on the first part
    – teepers
    Commented Jul 27, 2015 at 1:14
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    You probably want to write inhuman. It's a lot more common: corpus.byu.edu/coca/?c=coca&q=40676859
    – user230
    Commented Jul 27, 2015 at 1:18
  • But "unhuman" is a little more powerful because it's not so common. It slows down the brain a tiny bit, for a moment.
    – MMacD
    Commented Dec 14, 2016 at 21:03

1 Answer 1

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No, it's not a comma splice. A comma splice is a term for joining two (unrelated or unlike) sentences together with a comma without adding any kind of conjunction:

Clowns wear funny noses, I don't like pie.

What you've done is place a comma between a verb and its subject, which is in most cases not allowed. Just get rid of the comma:

The words demoniacal corpse suggest that the creature is unnatural and inhuman.

Commas in this position are occasionally used to avoid misinterpretation or make a sentence easier to read:

Most of those who can, work at home.
(The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, p.1730)

Here, the comma prevents you from misreading work at home as part of the subject and then getting confused when the sentence ends early. But outside of exceptions like this, commas are almost always a bad idea between a verb and its subject.

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  • What about the next part? It creates an image of an evil monster, existing only to cause misery to mankind, which is quite the opposite of what the creature intends to do.
    – teepers
    Commented Jul 27, 2015 at 1:17
  • @BrianTipold Those commas are both fine.
    – user230
    Commented Jul 27, 2015 at 1:18

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