1

I'd like to compare the size of my current house with the one of my old house. When we compare two things, depending on what we put more emphasis on, we can organize the sentences in different ways. So I've made 3 sentences and I'd like to know if these sentences mean all the same. or Are there any differences in meaning?

  1. The size of my current house is pretty much the same as the one of my old house.

  2. My current house has pretty much the same size as my old house has.

  3. The sizes of my current house and my old house are pretty much the same.

  • All three sentences are correct and have the same meaning (disregarding emphasis of course). – Sander Jul 30 '15 at 17:27
  • There are grammatical blue notes in these sentences. See elc's answer below. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jul 30 '15 at 17:44
2

All mean the same thing, but your wording in the first two examples is odd (maybe even wrong). In 1, "the one of " should be "that of", but that would often just be omitted. In 2 the house 'having' a size instead of 'being' a size is extremely quirky sounding. 3 is right, but still not how it would normally be said.

    The size of my current house is pretty much the same as my old house. (typical)
    The size of my current house is pretty much the same as that of my old house. (verbose)

    My current house **is** pretty much the same size as my old house.(common)

    The sizes of my current house and my old house are pretty much the same.(odd)
    My current house and my old house are pretty much the same size.(common)
  • Though "has the same size" is idiomatic with "that" instead of "as" books.google.com/ngrams/… – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jul 30 '15 at 17:46
  • I'm not sure what you are trying to show there. You graph "have the same size" versus "has the same size" and the difference there would be the subject for which 'to have' is being conjugated and whether it is plural or not. Anyway, my point was that 'that' is preferable to 'the one' in the context of the first sentence--I believe because it is the object of the verb. – elc Jul 30 '15 at 18:50

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.