1

I am wondering if the two bold parts mean the same thing, if so, what do they mean?

A. There's a lot to do so get your jacket off and get stuck in.

B. Gertrude early aptitude for swimming marked her for future greatness. When she swam the English Channel, the first woman to do so, she broke the man's speed record for that swim.

Thanks

2

No, they don't mean the same thing, mainly because 'so' plays a different grammatical role:

A. There's a lot to do, so get your jacket off and get stuck in.

In this case, 'so' is a conjunction and connects the two sentence parts.

When she swam the English Channel, the first woman to do so, she broke the man's speed record for that swim.

In this case, 'so' is an adverb, and it is a substitute for the preceding clause 'swam the English Channel'.

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