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I am trying to say:

Although by assuming XX won't hurt us, in the sense that YY, it(XX) makes the proof of most theorems become trivial and less interesting, and remove this assumption (XX) will allow us to dig out more properties behind those theorems.

I am not sure I use the right logic in "Although" sentence... I want to emphasize the second half of this sentence. Should I change the second "and" to "but"?

Also, if you see any other grammar error or wired usage of words, please comment out!

Thank you!

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    The entire clause in the sense ... less interesting is parenthetical (optional), so ignore that while checking the rest. The basic structure should then be clear - Although A, B (or A, but B), where A and B should be statements. For example, Although living is dangerous, dying is even worse. – FumbleFingers Aug 8 '15 at 12:05
  • @FumbleFingers So it is right to say: "Although XX still need more details, I think this is the right way to do it" ? – JumpJump Aug 8 '15 at 12:07
  • @FumbleFingers I once thought that "Although" can not pair with "but" – JumpJump Aug 8 '15 at 12:08
  • As I said, you can express advantage/disadvantage using either Although A, B or A, but B. Choose one or the other "contrasting conjunction", but you can't use both at once. Also note that A and B are statements, which have to be grammatically correct in themselves. So your example XX still need more details is only valid if XX is a plural noun (such as the workmen). If XX is a singular noun (such as the project) the verb form must be needs. – FumbleFingers Aug 8 '15 at 12:19
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  1. Delete byby in this context casts assuming XX as the means through which a subject achieves some end. What you seem to mean is that it is the assumption itself which will not hurt us.

  2. It in this context won't refer to XX but to assuming XX.

  3. Delete become—that thought is already expressed in the verb make = "cause to become".

  4. Change remove to removing—an 'unmarked' infinitive cannot act as a nominal.

  5. As FumbleFingers says, you can use although or but to express a contrast, but not both. You could use but to set off the final clause in order to express a different contrast than the one expressed by although; but in this case the final clause is not a contrast with your argument in the first independent clause but a reinforcement of the argument from a different persepective. You could use an "on the one hand ... on the other hand" articulation, or set off the last clause with while. In any case, I'd point this with a semi-colon, to mark the change of perspective more strongly.

Although assuming XX won't hurt us, in the sense that YY, it makes the proof of most theorems trivial and less interesting; and removing this assumption will allow us to dig out more properties behind those theorems.

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