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I wrote this sentence

Then the extracted content is refined by adding or removing the node content to or from it.

I used "to or from" in respect with "adding or removing", is it correct? Are there other methods? Should I always obey the rule or sometimes I can just mention one preposition, the last one for example:

Then the extracted content is refined by adding or removing the node content from it.

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    Both "to or from it" and "from it" are redundant. You're already stating "adding or removing." You could even simplify by using "modifying" instead.
    – mkennedy
    Aug 12 '15 at 21:16
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    Just omit "to or from it".
    – user3169
    Aug 12 '15 at 22:12
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    I suppose you're just speaking about this case.
    – Ahmad
    Aug 13 '15 at 4:39
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I'll keep using your example but I mean it to be general and apply to similar sentences. In this specific case I agree with the commenter that "Then the extracted content is refined by adding or removing the node content" is best.

Then the extracted content is refined by adding or removing the node content to or from it.

This is fine. It's a bit clunky, but everyone will understand it, and as far as I know, it doesn't break any 'rules'. There are lots of other possibilities, but none of them sound completely smooth - there isn't a really natural way of phrasing this in English that I know of.

Then the extracted content is refined by adding or removing the node content from it.

Everyone will understand this as well, but I think it technically has a different meaning because it implies that node content can be "added from the extracted content", rather than added to it. But the way it's phrased, nobody would interpret it that way - I think in an informal context this would be fine, and actually is what you're probably most likely to hear in normal speech.

Then the extracted content is refined by adding/removing the node content to/from it.

I think this is just as clear as the first option, but less clunky. It's a bit less formal, but I'd still use it in academic writing, for instance.

Then the extracted content is refined by adding to it or removing from it the node content.

This is the least technically ambiguous but is a bit convoluted and horrid to read, so I think it'd be correct but I don't recommend it.

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    Another option could be Then the extracted content is refined by adding the node content to or removing the node content from it.
    – Ahmad
    Aug 13 '15 at 15:30
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One adds to and removes from things.

Add from and remove to mean something different from add to and remove from. So you are doing the right thing by using both prepositions.

Then the extracted content is refined by adding or removing the node content to or from it.

Then the extracted content is refined by adding or removing the node content.

There is a difference in meaning between these two. The first sentence means that the content is added to or removed from the extracted content. The second could mean content is added to or removed from something other than the extracted content, though many would assume you meant to/from "the extracted content."

To be 100% clear, I would use the first sentence, even if it is a bit wordy. But if the paragraph or conversation this sentence is a part of does not talk about anything else where "adding or removing the node content" would make sense other than "to/from the extracted content" - it is redundant and really not needed.

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