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I wrote this sentence:

In this paper, we propose a wrapper generation system for extracting main content from web pages which is easy to use and understand by an average user. At the same time, it is expressive and powerful enough to cover most tasks in content extraction scenarios.

I don't know my usage of "at the same time" is correct or what are alternative words and sentences for my purpose? I mean when you count a benefit of something, but you want to say while it has this benefit, it also has that benefit too which could be a bit in contrast of the first benefit. For example X Software is an easy to use software but ..... covers most advanced tasks.

  • have you tried "Simultaneously" ? – Cardinal Aug 13 '15 at 19:55
  • @Cardinal I think I need something like "yet". please read the revision – Ahmad Aug 13 '15 at 20:06
  • Are you implying that the X provide Y at cost of Z ? :) ! – Cardinal Aug 13 '15 at 20:10
  • @Cardinal something that provide two benefit which seem are opposed with each other. for example simplicity and comprehensiveness.. – Ahmad Aug 13 '15 at 20:14
  • @Cardinal No it provides both of them, it just depends how you want to use it. – Ahmad Aug 13 '15 at 20:18
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I would use even so:

Nevertheless, still, that being the case.

Or just use nevertheless.

This expresses the contrast between "easy to use" and "expressive and powerful enough".

So:

In this paper, we propose a wrapper generation system for extracting main content from web pages which is easy to use and understand by an average user. Even so, it is expressive and powerful enough to cover most tasks in content extraction scenarios.

I would not use time phrases since you are describing qualities, not actions.

  • expressiveness and powerful are expressed as a surprise to the first benefits. I would like a phrase to convey that. – Ahmad Aug 13 '15 at 20:17
  • I would respectfully disagree somewhat with this suggestion. "As such" implies a consequence; that the system's simplicity of use is the predicate for its complexity and power. Clearly, the simplicity and power are offered as distinct features – David W Aug 13 '15 at 20:17
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    @DavidW Agreed. I edited with a hopefully better option. Try, try again. – user3169 Aug 13 '15 at 20:41
  • I think that's a much better option, @user3169! – David W Aug 13 '15 at 20:44
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Taken literally, "Simultaneously" and "At the same time" are, in fact, synonymous. However, in this particular context, "Simultaneously" is arguably too precise. "At the same time" is also used as a euphemism to convey an additional benefit at the opposite end of an extreme. In this case, the writer indicates the system is "easy to use...by an average user," conveying simplicity at the one end of the complexity spectrum. Yet the writer goes on to say that it offers additional capabilities that make it "expressive and powerful" for more complex users - the opposite end of the complexity spectrum - and the system offers these feature "at the same time." The intent is to suggest the system offers wide capability in a single "package."

No, it isn't necessarily wrong to say "simultaneously," but the word does tend to imply a literal chronological context that really isn't present if used in this instance.

  • Thanks, then you mean I used "at the same time" correctly? are the other words for such use? – Ahmad Aug 13 '15 at 20:10
  • I think your use is perfectly acceptable. – David W Aug 13 '15 at 20:15

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