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What is the usage of "in this regard", I didn't find good examples or definition to get its usage. When is it used? What is its difference with "in this respect" or any "in this X" that I don't know.

The following sentences are some examples showing how I think about them and use them:

Some students may have auditory problem; in this regard, teachers should get sure a student hear the words correctly.

The internet speed is low in this country; in this respect, it is one of the worst countries to use internet.

In my opinion, the teacher treated the student badly; in this regard, I prefer to not speak more.

There is a shortage of skilled labor in this city. Decision makers should do something in this regard.

I can't understand the Einstein theories. In this regard my knowledge is incomplete.

He runs very fast. In this respect he is one of the fastest boys I have ever seen.

Is my sense of them correct?

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    Just use Google ngram for this sort of question: in this regard, in this respect and then click on the results links to see actual uses. Voting to close as too broad. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 14 '15 at 12:18
  • books.google.com/ngrams/… – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 14 '15 at 12:21
  • @TRomano Ok! I added my sentences to the question, I also searched and looked the dictionary, but their definition or examples give me no idea. Google says it is used "in connection with the point previously mentioned." "there was little incentive for them to be active in this regard". but when I don't know the previous sentence, I can't find it. – Ahmad Aug 14 '15 at 12:21
  • @TRomano by the way I should say, google ngram is banned for Iranians!!! the politics. – Ahmad Aug 14 '15 at 12:23
  • As I said, the tools for answering this sort of question are abundant. You will get a far better sense of how to use these phrases by examining these phrases in actual use than you will from some abstract definition. They're virtually interchangeable. The main nuance will be their placement in the sentence. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 14 '15 at 12:23
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In this regard and in this respect refer back to an idea expressed in the previous statement.

Consider your example:

There is a shortage of skilled labor in this city. Decision makers should do something in this regard.

The second sentence can be paraphrased:

Decision makers should do something about that.

where "that" refers to the shortage of skilled labor in that city.

Or this example:

The internet speed is low in this country; in this respect, it is one of the worst countries to use internet.

The second sentence could be paraphrased:

... in terms of speed, it is one of the worst places to use the internet.

or

when the criterion is speed, it is one of the worst places to use the internet.

"in this respect" refers to the slowness that is mentioned in the preceding clause.

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  • Thank you very much, then you say my usage of the phrase in my examples are sensible and correct? – Ahmad Aug 14 '15 at 12:52
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    I would say that there is really no need for an "in this regard" in that sentence, and that the core idea of your first clause is not clear enough to support an "in this regard". Your first clause refers to the examination of "the features" in order to determine whether a node is a text node. One could say simply To determine whether a node is a text node, its features are examined. All nodes are examined in the same way. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 14 '15 at 13:01
  • thank you, but just why "All nodes"? should I say "all the nodes"?!, however I like "all nodes" better. – Ahmad Aug 14 '15 at 13:39
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    We're on different wavelengths, Ahmad. I find these sentences vague and needlessly wordy. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 14 '15 at 13:52
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    Interestingly, when I want to explain the issue here, I use better sentences! – Ahmad Aug 14 '15 at 16:45
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"In this regard", "in this respect", "in this vein" all have the same meaning. They are used to give more details or illustrations about something.

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