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I'm comfortable saying like this:

  1. My ex was a vegetarian and that's why I got a lot of chance to eat vegetables.

  2. If my ex hadn't been a vegetarian I wouldn't have gotten a lot of chance to eat vegetables.

And I'd like to mix these two.

  1. My ex was a vegetarian and that's why I got more chance to eat vegetables than I would have if my ex hadn't been a vegetarian.

  2. If my ex hadn't been a vegetarian I wouldn't have gotten as much chance to eat vegetables as I actually got .

Can I say like #3 and #4 using more than and as ~ as.. sentence pattern?

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Yes, you could. But first, I would fix your usage of "chance". You get "a lot of (or more) chances", not "a lot of (or more) chance". And you can have "as many chances" or "as much of achance". Whether "chance" is a count noun depends on whether you think of a chance as a discrete opportunity, or of chance as a continuously variable level of likelihood.

Anyway, number 4 sounds okay, except that I would say as many chances" rather than "as much chance"

Number 3, however, seems long-winded. I would simplify it thus:

  • My ex was a vegetarian, and that's why I got more chances to eat vegetables than I would have otherwise.

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