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I don't like to say 'problem' since it sounds like I have a serious problem. Is there any adjectives that I can add so that it doesn't sound serious.

I'm talking about something about food I eat. For example:

I'm not picky about the food I eat. There are few foods I don't like to eat. And I'm a person who likes to do something new and even when it comes to foods, I like to try something that I haven't eaten before. But, I have a problem with eating. I mean there are times when I eat more than I should if I don't want to feel too full.

I don't like to say 'problem' since it sounds like I have a serious problem. Is there any adjectives that I can add so that it doesn't sound serious. Or doesn't it sound like I have a serious problem with eating – like eating disorder – even though I just say it as stated here?

  • You could say that you have difficulty eating. – Sander Aug 17 '15 at 16:20
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You don't need to mention a problem at all -- your but implies sufficient contrast between the positive things about your diet and the negative effect of overeating. You might want to change that "conditional" effect to a definite effect, to underscore the negative quality.

I'm not picky about the food I eat. There are few foods I don't like to eat. And I'm a person who likes to do something new and even when it comes to foods, I like to try something that I haven't eaten before. But there are times when I eat more than I should—and feel too full.

  • how about this? "I have something of a problem with eating? " – jihoon Aug 19 '15 at 4:15
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I like StoneyB's answer. He removed the adjective from the equation, thereby nullifying its negative connotations. And that is the problem/issue/mess/complication/pickle/obstacle/trouble. As you can see from the string of synonyms (different words with the same meaning), that it is not the word you say, but how it is said. Adding context gives meaning.

For example:

  • The dead battery is a problem.

That seems pretty benign.

Take this example:

  • The dead battery which controls the nuclear reactor is a problem

With a little more information, the same "problem" becomes more serious.

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You can just describe it as a "small problem." As you say, "I have a problem with eating" sounds a bit ominous by itself. Something like "I have a small eating problem" or "I have a small problem with eating" seems like it would fit your purposes just fine. Other adjectives work too, like "minor problem." You could also describe it as an "inconvenience" instead of a problem.

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