4

Some of rules can be the same for most websites.

vs.

Some rules can be the same for most websites.

I think I want to say

Some of these rules can be the same for most websites.

2
  • I think you may want to say Some [of these] rules are common to most websites. Much depends on whether you mean common = occur frequently or common = shared equally. Aug 17, 2015 at 18:10
  • @FumbleFingers as I checked it again, actually, I meant to say "the same for".
    – Ahmad
    Aug 17, 2015 at 18:27

2 Answers 2

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The word some goes in the central determiner position. Other words that can go in this position are:

  • a, the, my, no, any, either

We can only use one word in this position. If we want to use the words some, any either or numerals before another word in central determiner position, we can't. It's not grammatical:

  • *any the people (ungrammatical)
  • *some my friends (ungrammatical)
  • *either the glasses (ungrammatical)
  • *one my cats (ungrammatical)

In this situation we need to use any/some/either/one and the preposition of before the central determiner:

  • any of the people
  • some of my friends
  • either of the glasses
  • one of my cats

If there is no other word in central determiner position, we cannot use X of with a normal noun:

  • *any of people (ungrammatical)
  • *some of friends (ungrammatical)
  • *any of glasses (ungrammatical)
  • *one of cats (ungrammatical)

We just use the determiner on its own:

  • any people
  • some friends
  • any glasses
  • one cat

The original Poster's question:

  1. *Some of rules can be the same for most websites. (ungrammatical)

  2. Some rules can be the same for most websites.

  3. Some of these rules can be the same for most websites.

Sentence (1) is ungrammatical because there is no second determiner after the word of. Sentence (2) is grammatical, but it doesn't tell us which group of rules we are talking about. Sentence (3) is also grammatical. We know that the group of rules that can be the same is a subset of these rules. We don't know what these rules are without the context, but the sentence would be fine if we knew what the context was.

3
  1. Some of rules can be the same for most websites.

  2. Some rules can be the same for most websites.

  3. Some of these rules can be the same for most websites.

The sentence #1 isn't correct grammatically. You use "some of" in front of plural nouns beginning with the, a demonstrative pronoun or a possessive. So you can say "some of the/these rules, but you cannot say some of rules. Some of the/these rules implies that you are referring to part of specific rules. On the other hand, some rules means a limited or unspecified number of rules in general.

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  • Then you suggest some of these rules?
    – Ahmad
    Aug 17, 2015 at 19:49
  • It could also be some of the rules (but not some of rules). You could also use many in place of some for all three of these suggestions.
    – J.R.
    Aug 17, 2015 at 21:08
  • J.R./Ahmed, I agree.
    – Khan
    Aug 18, 2015 at 0:03

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