1

Here's the context:

I have gone on a trip and am staying at a hotel. I'd like to ask how much money I have to pay for the swimming pool in the hotel.

  1. I'd like to ask how much money it costs me to use the swimming pool.

Can I omit 'money' here?

  1. I'd like to ask how much it is that I use the swimming pool.

I feel I can use it this way, but I'm not sure.

  1. I'd like to ask how much money I have to pay for using the swimming pool.

I feel comfortable saying it like this.

Am I right in thinking that all of these sentences are correct?

1
  • 1
    They all say what I think you intend to convey. I would only correct (2) to remove extraneous "that I" and replace it with "to": "how much it is to use the swimming pool?". And you don't really need to say "I'd like to ask". Just ask: "How much is it to use the swimming pool?" Commented Aug 18, 2015 at 12:31

1 Answer 1

1
  1. This sentence is okay - and yes, "money" can be (and usually is) omitted - but I would word it like this:

I'd like to know how much it costs (for me) to use the swimming pool.

  1. No. Consider this sentence:

I'd like to ask how much it costs for me to use the swimming pool.

  1. This sentence is almost correct; it just needs a few adjustments:

I'd like to ask how much money I have to pay (in order) to use the swimming pool.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .