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I know a lot of non-native-english-speakers (including myself) who use the word "actually" very often.

What are alternative words to use instead of the word "actually"?

My other favorite is "obviously".

I guess what am I looking for is some keywords to use while connecting the sentences.

Some examples:

  • Actually, I'm just asking to know.
  • Actually, I don't think that it's true.
  • Actually, he was so kind to me.
  • Actually, I'm not sure.
  • Actually, that was what I thought.
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    Some examples how you use these words would be helpful. Often they are just lead-in words (my term). Such words do not really add any meaning, but make the statement following them less abrupt. They aren't conjunctions, so they are not really connecting anything. – user3169 Aug 19 '15 at 2:43
  • Yeah, you're right! That's exactly what they are. "Lead-in words" title fits on them, I think. So my question can also be asked as "what are some good lead-in words?" :) They are kind of decorative words rather than being meaningful. – scaryguy Aug 19 '15 at 2:46
  • I updated the question – scaryguy Aug 19 '15 at 2:48
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    In fact. In point of fact. To tell the truth. You know what? W e l l . . . Ah! Hmmm. How shall I put it? I must tell you. I have to admit. I've been toying with the notion that. – StoneyB Aug 19 '15 at 2:54
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    @StoneyB, those sound good! Why don't you just add this as an answer? – scaryguy Aug 19 '15 at 2:55
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@StoneyB gave some good examples.

I will expand upon it by saying that "Acutally" as a lead-in word is not always appropriate and can be misleading or confusing. You should generally only use "actually" when you are contradicting or negating something that was previously said.

Examples:
A: "I thought that person was very rude."
B: "Actually, he was very kind to me."

A: "The capital of Germany is Frankfurt."
B: "Actually, the capital of Germany is Berlin."

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