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What does "the pop of the final bubble of breath from lips already cold" mean in the following passage?

One of the reasons that Newton's theories gained only gradual acceptance is that he wrote for mathematicians, and the full significance of his work was not accessible to any but those who were most highly trained in mathematics. He needed the aid of interpreters to bring the concepts of the Principia to the masses. One of the most effective of these interpreters was Voltaire, who invented the well known story of Newton and the falling apple, and explained the Newtonian philosophy in a 1737 work, whose publication can be seen as the end of Aristotelianism, the pop of the final bubble of breath from lips already cold.

http://www.sparknotes.com/history/european/scientificrevolution/section8.rhtml

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It is a metaphor for "the end of Aristotelianism." Aristotelianism is a person with 'lips already cold', or in usual word order: a person with 'already cold lips' or 'lips that are already cold'. Someone whose lips are alreay cold is very close to death. The last sign of life is 'the final bubble of breath'. The publication of the work popped this last bubble. This is the death, or end, of Aristotelianism.

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    No, Aristotelianism is not a person, but a school of thought initiated by Aristotel. It is that school of thought that gave the pop of the final bubble of breath from lips already cold, meaning simpliy died out with the publication of Newton's work. – Aleksey Aug 24 '15 at 8:21
  • @Aleksey: guest is saying that in the metaphor, Aristotelianism is personified. Schools of thought generally do not have lips, but people do. (Obviously, it is not a literal person; but the lips, bubble and breath are all metaphorical as well.) – sumelic Aug 24 '15 at 16:00
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Aristotelianism was the school of thought initiated by Aristotle. It is that school of thought that gave the pop of the final bubble of breath from lips already cold, meaning simpliy died out with the publication of Newton's work.

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