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I wrote this sentence:

From Web accessibility/usability point of view, speech rendering of the main content can provide better access to web pages for visually impaired users.

Before I had written it as:

In Web accessibility/usability, speech rendering of the main content can provide better access to web pages for visually impaired users.

It seems neither of them are natural, in what cases "from point of view" is used? How can I say my purpose in the above sentence? should I use FOR web accessibility,....?


Update: It seems I can write from accessibility ( or usability) point of view, can I write from accessibility and usability points of view?

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    As far as I know, point of view is countable, so you need an article if you write From an accessibility point of view.. – Damkerng T. Aug 24 '15 at 12:13
  • @DamkerngT. I have problem to start a sentence for a specific scope, in another sentence I wrote In constrained devices like mobile phones, presenting the main block can make browsing the page easier, should I use "in", "for", "over" in this sentence? – Ahmad Aug 24 '15 at 12:18
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    And you can eliminate excess verbiage: "Speech rendering of the main content can make web pages accessible to visually impaired users." You seem to be deliberately avoiding concision. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 24 '15 at 12:19
  • @TRomano For the answer of question, I thought of "In the case of Web accessibility" how's that? – Ahmad Aug 24 '15 at 12:28
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    It's a little over-written and foggy, Ahmad. The raw concept is: blind people need screen readers. It's not a case of "better access" because without a screen reader they have no access. – MMacD Dec 19 '16 at 12:11
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From Web accessibility/usability point of view, speech rendering of the main content can provide better access to web pages for visually impaired users.

"Point" is a singular non-proper noun (with adjectives in front of it) and needs an article in front it, most likely "a." - From a Web accessibility/usability point of view ...

In Web accessibility/usability, speech rendering of the main content can provide better access to web pages for visually impaired users.

In + {body of knowledge} is valid, i.e. "In philosophy, ... " or "In medicine, ... ".

In my opinion, the Web is relatively new in relation to other bodies of knowledge in the popular mind, so there are large groups of people who likely would not immediately understand that "Web accessibility/usability" is a body of knowledge. So it could be a bit jarring unless your audience is only Web developers.

  • I came up with "In the case of Web accessibility" – Ahmad Aug 24 '15 at 12:44
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Consider a "setup, point" format such as this, Ahmad.

[setup:]Although the Web has some multimedia capability, it is still a strongly visual medium. [point:]Browser software provides ways (larger type, stronger contrast) for people with limited vision to access the web visually, but for people without vision, a screen reader is needed.

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