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I don't understand the meaning of "that" in the following sentence:

Sociologists are, for the most part, interested in the same things that other social scientists are interested in, and that they are, however, not as limited in the scope or focus as are the others.

I would be grateful if someone could help me understand this.

closed as off-topic by FumbleFingers, Glorfindel, Karen, JMB, StoneyB Aug 25 '15 at 14:21

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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's based on a mistranscription (or some other reason why we're being presented with a garbled/nonsense utterance). – FumbleFingers Aug 25 '15 at 12:16
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    @FumbleFingers: I agree; but OP should be congratulated on knowing enough English to realize that there's something odd here. – StoneyB Aug 25 '15 at 14:22
  • @Araucaria Alas, your ingenuity is misplaced - we have the original. And as I explain below, the confirmative reading won't work here. – StoneyB Aug 25 '15 at 16:04
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This sentence is badly garbled; it appears to be a mistranscription which has introduced the meaningless and that. The original reads:

Sociologists are, for the most part, interested in the same things that other social scientists are interested in. They are, however, not as limited in the scope or focus as are the others.

You may have encountered this as a mispointed quotation:

James Henslin says that "Sociologists are, for the most part, interested in the same things that other social scientists are interested in" and that "they are, however, not as limited in the scope or focus as are the others".

  • I think such sentences are seen in spoken language of Persian, when the speaker is you and you want to add another sentence but to prepare the listener for that. I remember once I asked you if there is such thing in English or not! – Ahmad Aug 25 '15 at 12:24
  • Thank you for the information about the original text. I took this sentence from a problem book for Japanese high school students. All the problems in the book are taken from entrance examination problems of various Japanese Universities. I don't know where the mistranscription occurred. – Aki Aug 25 '15 at 12:52
  • Possibly some quotation marks are missing, and the text should be something like In reference 123, Henslin writes "Sociologists are, for the most part, interested in the same things that other social scientists are interested in", and that "they are, however, not as limited in the scope or focus as are the others." – alephzero Aug 25 '15 at 13:50
  • @alephzero Isn't that what I say in my last paragraph? – StoneyB Aug 25 '15 at 14:20
  • @stoney Ssshhh. Pssst. Come here ... How about, "We think the elephants are happy, and that they are, thought not as serene as are the sloths". – Araucaria Aug 25 '15 at 15:44
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Sociologists are, for the most part, interested in the same things that other social scientists are interested in, and that they are, however, not as limited in the scope or focus as are the others.

It seems something has been omitted from the sentence. Anyway that refers to the whole sentence of the second part. like you say

Sociologists are, for the most part, interested in the same things that other social scientists are interested in, and (this matter/ I think/ I must add/ in addition to) that they are, however, not as limited in the scope or focus as are the others.

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