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I wrote:

Then, using this anchors, a pattern named "Products" is created enclosing the following region of the anchor.

instead of

Then, using this anchors, a pattern named "Products" enclosing the following region of the anchor, is created.

or

To restrict this region even more, another anchor can be used marking the end of the block.

Can a pattern that encloses and anchor that marks be written as above?

  • Can it be odd to say "Then, using this anchors, a pattern named "Products" is created to enclose the following region of the anchor." – Cardinal Aug 28 '15 at 22:27
  • @Cardinal good suggestion, others may can answer it – Ahmad Aug 29 '15 at 6:27
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If my understanding of what you are saying is correct, I recommend rewriting those sentences as

Then, using this anchor, a pattern named "Products" is created enclosing the region that follows the anchor.

and

To restrict this region even more, another anchor can be used to mark the end of the block.

Also, you seem to refer to the created portion as "pattern" in one and as "block" in the other. It can have been intentional or perhaps I misunderstood and they are not related.


To address the changes in the question: The sentence in which such a short predicate is placed at the end after such a long subclause, looks somewhat awkward, although grammatically correct. By the time they reach "is created" the reader may forget what it is that was created. I recommend against such constructs.

  • They are the same, but then you admit that I can relocate the relative clause like that? – Ahmad Aug 28 '15 at 14:56
  • You mean the clause "enclosing the region..."? – Victor Bazarov Aug 28 '15 at 15:01
  • Yes, as a relative clause for the pattern "Products" – Ahmad Aug 28 '15 at 15:03
  • I think it's ok (as you wrote it). You say you relocated it, but you don't say from where. Or are you thinking of relocating it elsewhere? Perhaps you want to edit your question... – Victor Bazarov Aug 28 '15 at 15:07
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    The meanings of "created enclosing" and "created to enclose" can be slightly different. Similar to the difference in "created so it encloses" and "created in order to enclose". It is subtle enough that the reader can easily miss it, so it's up to you. In other words, yes, you could say "created to enclose". – Victor Bazarov Aug 29 '15 at 12:31

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