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The price anchor can be specified by a text pattern of price and currency (e.g. \$NN.NN), and the shipping information can be specified by the "Ship" or "Get it by" keywords and a date pattern such as "Get it by Month day" or "Ships within N days".

The ellipsis occurs after shipping information

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    ...Yes...it is... – user20792 Aug 28 '15 at 15:31
  • ...No...it isn't... – Evorlor Aug 28 '15 at 18:19
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    @Ahmad Do you mean the punctuation "..." or the linguistic idea? – Aaron Brown Aug 28 '15 at 18:50
  • Oh, you mean you want to combine the two occurrences of "can be specified"... I think it looks fine to me... It's a bit distant from the first "can be specified" but I understand it. – Catija Aug 28 '15 at 20:29
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If you mean linguistic ellipsis, then yes: that is fine. The sentence sounds natural and will be understood even though you elided the words "can be specified" in the second part.

If you mean typographical ellipsis (the punctuation mark "..."), then I don't understand exactly what you are asking.

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  • yes linguistic ellipsis – Ahmad Aug 28 '15 at 20:20
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Are you editorially leaving out text from a quote of someone else's writing? If so, great, that's a good use of an ellipsis character. It means "there used to be more here that I considered irrelevant".

Otherwise, no, that's just stuttering. There's no pause in the thought of the sentence here, so inserting a long one makes no sense. Even though you are eliding unnecessary text that's implied by context, this isn't the editorial style, just the usual pattern of the language, so no punctuation is necessary or usable. Just leave out the repeated phrase and don't put anything in its place.

The price anchor can be specified by a text pattern of price and currency (e.g.\$NN.NN), and the shipping information by the "Ship" or "Get it by" keywords and a date pattern such as "Get it by Month day" or "Ships within N days".

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  • that is the sentence I wrote and mean linguistic ellipsis – Ahmad Aug 28 '15 at 20:20
  • @Ahmad: OK. I think I see the issue and have addressed it. – Nathan Tuggy Aug 28 '15 at 20:22
  • But I didn't get your answer, you mean my usage of ellipsis is formal and correct? and also there is no need for any punctuation as I didn't use? – Ahmad Aug 28 '15 at 20:28
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    @Ahmad: The ellipsis character () should not be used, even though, grammatically, you are using a pattern of omission that is also called "ellipsis"; English uses ellipsis so often and so naturally that special punctuation to signify it is pretty much only used to avoid misquoting someone. – Nathan Tuggy Aug 28 '15 at 20:38

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