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Some people get relief from bad dreams by writing them down and then changing the negative stories or thoughts into positive ones on the written paper. Then they study the paper before they go to sleep again.

Is the use of "the written paper" in the first sentence and the use of "the paper" in the second sentence correct?

Thanks a lot.

  • (The title and the format of the question are needed to be fixed, but let's do that later.) Did you write the text yourself? Or did you find it somewhere and doubt the usage? (It would be nice if you include the source or a link to the source of the text in your question.) -- By the way, welcome to ELL! – Damkerng T. Aug 29 '15 at 8:36
  • I think "on the paper" does not add any additional information."the paper" is correct grammatically. However, I think it is better to say "then they read the paper before .." – Cardinal Aug 29 '15 at 10:14
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The only place where you're likely to find written paper used as a compound noun is in the context of examinations - specifically, things like driving or language tests (with practical/oral tests which can be distinguished from the written part of the exam).

It's not idiomatic to use written paper to mean piece of paper which has been written on. As an attributive adjective (coming before a noun), written is normally only used in contexts where it distinguishes something from other possible formats (spoken, illustrated, acted out, etc.).

In purely practical terms, you probably wouldn't write the bad dream on paper and then change it (making changes on real paper gets messy compared to editing text on a computer). Most likely you'd simply make changes as you write the text, so...

Some people get relief from bad dreams by writing them down on paper, changing the negative stories or thoughts into positive ones. Then they study the paper before...

For stylistic reasons, I'd probably change writing to setting, and add but before changing

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