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  • He dashed back across the road, hurried up to his office, snapped at his secretary not to disturb him,
  • "On vacation in Majorca," snapped Aunt Petunia.
  • "What did you say?" his aunt snapped through the door.

J. K. Rowling, the author of Harry Potter, used lots of "snap" when writing chapters involving with Harry's Uncle and Aunt, it really kind of confuse me with all the different meaning I find in the dictionary.

closed as off topic by FumbleFingers, WendiKidd May 19 '13 at 17:14

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    If you do not know the meaning of a word, try looking it up in any online dictionary. For example: dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/snap_4 – fluffy May 19 '13 at 6:21
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    I think this is General Reference, but that's not available as a closevote reason, so it's Too Localised. The second definition from Merriam-Webster says snap: to utter sharp biting words : bark out irritable or peevish retorts. – FumbleFingers May 19 '13 at 14:03
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    Hi agressionexp, welcome to ELL! As per the FAQ, questions entirely answerable by a dictionary are off topic for this site. All the same, you seem to have gotten a helpful answer. I hope you keep these rules in mind and continue to post questions here in the future! :) – WendiKidd May 19 '13 at 17:14
  • @WendiKidd please look closely on my question, I already said I am confuse with all the different meaning I find in the dictionary, which means I already look up the dictionary, but still confused, that is why I posted this question. – aggressionexp May 19 '13 at 18:15
  • @ aggressionexp: Both mine and fluffy's dictionary links seem pretty straightforward to me. In Jim's "accepted" answer you have to look through several (less common, more or less loosely related) definitions, but again it shouldn't have been hard to pick the one that makes sense in your context. I don't understand why weren't you able to do this instead of asking here. – FumbleFingers May 19 '13 at 18:55
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snap :(intransitive) To speak abruptly or sharply.

Aunt Petunia is is a rather sour woman and snaps at people a lot.

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It means "to speak or say something in an impatient, usually angry, voice."

"Don't just stand there," she snapped.

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