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“Confidential Information” shall include, Supplier’s patterns, buying plans, customer information and guidelines, and any or all trade or design related information that Supplier may create or come into possession of through or in connection with this Agreement.

How to parse this sentence's structure?

Does "Supplier may create or come into possession of through or in connection with this Agreement" only modify "design related information" or all of "any or all trade, Supplier’s patterns, buying plans, customer information and guidelines"?

  • Welcome to ELL! Not sure what you mean by "decorate" or "divide the sentence's structure". Could you clarify those two? – M.A.R. Aug 30 '15 at 8:34
  • @inɒzɘmɒЯ.A.M OP means "modify" and "parse". – StoneyB Aug 30 '15 at 10:24
  • This question should include more details than have been provided here. Please edit to add the research you have done in your efforts to answer the question, or provide more context. See: Details, Please. – Mrt Aug 30 '15 at 11:23
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    "Decorate" is programming jargon. A function or class can be "decorated" with properties; and the scope of the decoration, the thing to which it applies, is determined by its location. The OP is asking about the "scope" of the restrictive clause. What nouns in the preceding clauses does it govern? – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 30 '15 at 11:36
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I love the smell of legalese in the morning.

This is tripping over its shoelaces:

any or all ... information ... that Supplier may create or come into possession of through or in connection with this Agreement.

Just change "come into possession of" to "obtain".

P.S. The usual purpose of such boilerplate is to be as inclusive as possible. These clauses typically contain the phrase "... shall include, without limitation" or "...shall include but not be limited to". Here, your "any or all" goes in that direction. A court would be likely to err on the side of inclusiveness when interpreting the phrase "that Supplier may create or obtain through or in connection with this Agreement", so if the desire is to exclude any sort of information, whether created or obtained, you should spell it out explicitly. An argument that the restrictive clause applies only to information related to trade or design probably wouldn't stand. A court would probably say "patterns, plans, guidelines" also fall under the scope of the restrictive clause "that supplier may create or obtain through or in connection with this Agreement".

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