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If not, please tell me the alternative.

These types of issues cannot be haphazardly assigned opinions/judgements/views to them without first taking a methodical approach to studying them.

I am not sure that the word "assigned" is appropriate here. Can it be replaced with "given"?

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Answer

I recommend:

One should study these matters before forming an opinion.


I see the following issues with the original sentence construction.

  • Double-negatives. Writers should avoid them.
  • Redundancy. The writer refers to "types of issues" 3 times.
  • Passive voice. Writers should choose active voice.

These factors combined in the original sentence to make an awkward expression of the writer's idea.


Reasoning and references

The above "issues" are not rules as much as they are generally accepted guides studied and used by many professional writers. I refer you to the classic text on the subject: The Elements of Style by Strunk and White.

English is a flexible language. There are many ways to express ideas that are technically proper English but might not be the most effective way to communicate. Guidelines set forth in The Elements of Style bridge much of the gap between what is correct English and what is effective English.

  • There's no actual rule about any of those three things... that may be your preference but, depending on the type of writing, they're all perfectly acceptable, if not (in the case of passive voice) preferable. – Catija Aug 31 '15 at 2:39
  • @Catija. I agree. These are not rules as much as they are generally accepted guides used by professional writers. I refer you to the classic text on the subject: The Elements of Style by Strunk and White. English is a flexible language. There are many ways to express ideas that are technically proper English but might not be the most effective way to communicate using the English language. Guidelines in The Elements of Style bridge much of the gap between what is correct English and what is effective English. – Mowzer Aug 31 '15 at 2:43
  • Don't refer me to them... you're the one making assertions without supporting them. If you're going to make statements in your answer, explain them and cite some references. :) That's how you write a good answer. Telling a learner "don't do this" without explaining why to not do it, doesn't really help them. – Catija Aug 31 '15 at 2:46
  • That book is helpful. Much appreciated. – Ghaith Alrestom Aug 31 '15 at 3:20
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I'd say none, because one does not give their judgements or opinions to an issue, one gives their opinions and judgements to an audience regarding an issue, even if you yourself are the audience. Just think about it logically, you can't give your opinion on a book to the book, or give your opinion on a crime to the crime.

Furthermore, you're using "without first taking a methodical approach" in conjunction with "haphazardly", instead of cancelling "haphazardly" and providing the correct substitute. So essentially what the language says in your example is that it's okay to arrive at a haphazard opinion/view/judgement once you've methodically studied the issue. This of course is self contradictory because you're no longer taking haphazard action after giving serious disciplined and objective effort.

A better way to speak this would be to say:

One cannot haphazardly establish judgement or opinion on such issues, but rather must methodically study them and draw conclusions as objectively as possible.

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"Issues have things assigned to them", not "issues are things assigned to them". Also you need to rearrange the words:

These types of issues cannot have opinions/judgements/views assigned to them haphazardly, without first taking a methodical approach to studying them.

You could say "haphazardly assigned to them," but adverbs (haphazardly) usually go after the verb (assigned) not before it.

"Assigned to them" is sort-of-OK, but "applied to them" or "associated with them" might be better. You can't really "give" something to an abstract idea like "an opinion", so "given" doesn't work here.

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