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I wrote

After selecting an element, a pop-up allows for creating an anchor based on the element features. As can be seen from Figure 3, in addition to the element's content, one may utilize stable and semantic labels used for specific tag's attributes [to specify an anchor], such as id and class name (e.g. "main" value for the main division of a page).

First, considering the context, do I need "to specify an anchor" clause?

If yes, how can I add "such as" to the sentence? Could it be in a clause after the main clause?

Below is Figure 3, which is the interface for creating (specifying) an anchor.

enter image description here

  • the such as clause supplements "labels" and should be adjacent to that noun. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 31 '15 at 11:17
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After selecting an element, a pop-up allows for creating an anchor based on the element features. As can be seen from Figure 3, in addition to the element's content, one may utilize stable and semantic labels used for specific tag's attributes [to specify an anchor], such as id and class name (e.g. "main" value for the main division of a page).

First of all, you don't need to include [to specify an anchor]. The first sentence provides enough context for it to be clear that this why you're using the labels.

If I might try to help further, I have more...

I'll assume given the terminology that this is some kind of HTML or XML-based endeavour.

In tech documentation, clarity and brevity are key. Keep the sentences short and as easy to parse as possible. I've highlighted the three areas that I've edited in the quote above.

  1. The first edit introduces an actor (the user) to make the sentence easier to read. Passive sentences have their place, but this one made the point way more vague than it needed to be.
  2. The second edit removes "As can be seen from Figure 3" from the second sentence. That sentence was huge and had four commas slicing it up. Understanding it was very difficult.
  3. It's implied that they are the attributes of that specific tag. You can leave the word 'specific' out to improve readability.

After selecting an element, a pop-up allows the user to create an anchor based on the element features (Figure 3). In addition to the element's content, one may utilize stable and semantic labels used for that tag's attributes, such as id and class name (e.g. "main" value for the main division of a page).

Hope it helps!

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But I don't think you need to use "such as"

After selecting an element, a pop-up allows for creating an anchor based on the element's features. As can be seen from Figure 3, one may label the anchor with an ID or a class name (e.g. "main" for the main division of a page).

Though "creating ... based on" isn't very clear. I'm not sure what you mean.

If you want to explain why labels are better than content when naming an anchor, that could be done in a separate sentence. In general, you try to put too much information into your sentences.

**Using a label rather than the content itself as the name of the anchor has the advantage that labels are semantically meaningful and stable. **

  • Thank you, let's I say what is scenario, the anchor is specified using the element's attributes or the content. It is best to use the content or a pattern in the content to create an anchor out of an element, but one still can use attributes to specify it, anchors are like a class or pattern which are built based on an element. Considering these description, is "based on" meaningful? – Ahmad Aug 31 '15 at 12:48
  • For example on this page the word "Answer", which is an HTML element and its source code is <div class="subheader answers-subheader"><h2>1 Answer </h2></div>, is an anchor whose content is "Answer" and its class name is "subheader answers-subheader". If you use Fire fox by right-click > inspect Element, you can see that – Ahmad Aug 31 '15 at 12:55
  • I am very familiar with the DOM and HTML, so unfamiliarity with the subject is not the issue. Your language is unclear to me. I am not sure what you intend with "specify". I understand that you are using "anchor" in one sense and that HTML uses anchor <a> in another. When you say you identify anchors in the content using keywords and semantic cues, I understand you. But when you say you specify anchors using an element's attributes or the content, I don't know what you mean. Do you mean "uniquely identify"? – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 31 '15 at 13:49
  • So they occur in an application. I added the user interface for creating (specifying) an anchor. Anchors are stored as variables and are used in the program to be matched against a similar document. – Ahmad Aug 31 '15 at 15:20
  • The user creates an anchor and then defines how the anchor operates by specifying which of those three properties (id, class, text) the anchor should use when matching content for extraction? – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 31 '15 at 17:55

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