2

Example:

Finally, don't worry about damaging the computer. Unless you do something really stupid-such as throwing a glass of Coke into the computer while it's running-you won't hurt your PC. The only component that you could conceivably damage-if you don't count chips zapped by the homicidal static electricity-is the hard drive. The platters inside it are spinning at a breathtaking rate within fractions of a millimeter from other parts that could, if jostled, collide like race cars on Memorial Day. But don't worry. This is going to be a midnight run.

What are they talking about? What is a midnight run?

4
  • I have two guesses. One is this is going to take a night long. The other is this is going to be a midnight tour (where people would normally walk leisurely around a city, visiting interesting spots). I guess the latter is more likely. Sep 2 '15 at 7:37
  • I also had trouble deducing its meaning, as a native English speaker. Sep 2 '15 at 9:14
  • Looking at this source, Maulik V's answer seems correct.
    – Rucheer M
    Sep 2 '15 at 9:23
  • 2
    A midnight run is easy because it is one that avoids crowds, scrutiny and protocol. The stakes are high, but the risk is low, and if it goes well, it goes really well. Don't smuggle moonshine in the middle of the day when the cops might see you, or you could get stuck in a traffic jam, do it it in a midnight run. It is just barely applicable to this scenario. I read the rest of that page, and it looks like the writer likes to toss around exciting informal expressions.
    – Adam
    Sep 2 '15 at 17:39
1

If we go by dictionary, it means

midnight run: When people abandon their business and/or home, leaving quickly in the middle of the night. Abandoned houses will reveal clues about the former occupants. It is generally considered that people do a Midnight Run because of financial troubles, however it also may be to evade an abusive spouse, or to evade the law.

But, a 'midnight run' in this context is something that is pretty easy to do IMO.

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