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I have seen many sentences starting with proposition "with", and I want to use this sentence structure in my writing but I have difficulty to understand the meaning of it when it is being used at the beginning of a sentence.

Example: With its widespread reach and viral potential, it allows your business to connect with prospects in ways that no other marketing medium can.

Is the above word "with" same as such sentences "I went to the zoo with a friend" and "I had dinner with a glass of wine"

  • With all respect in my heart, yes, I can say that this is possible! – Maulik V Sep 2 '15 at 13:00
  • With its scarce rainfall, the desert is not a good place to grow crops. "with" there means almost "because of" or "given". With its high price, the Ferrari is not a car for the average person. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Sep 2 '15 at 13:22
  • You can replace this "with" by "due to" or simply by " because of". This "with" gives an explanation. – rogermue Sep 2 '15 at 13:52
  • Taking you zoo example, consider: I've never liked being in public spaces on my own, so I never went to the zoo because I had no-one to go with. That all changed when I got to know John - with a friend, I could go to the zoo without feeling alone in a crowd. – FumbleFingers Apr 17 '16 at 15:56
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With its widespread reach and viral potential, it allows your business to connect with prospects in ways that no other marketing medium can.

Let's turn it around and say,

It allows your business to connect with prospects, with its widespread reach and viral potential, in ways that no other marketing medium can.

The meaning here is the same but the original version sounds better since it keeps the consistency.

Is the above word "with" same as such sentences "I went to the zoo with a friend" and "I had dinner with a glass of wine"

Yes it is.

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    Though having the "with" phrase at the beginning is fine if you want to emphasize its content. You will often see/hear this format in media such as advertising or the news. – user3169 Sep 2 '15 at 18:45

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