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Okay, I'm not sure how to phrase this question, but I want to know if below sentences are correct.

Because I met him in New York in 2011 and he moved here last year, I can assume that he at least had lived in New York from 2011 to 2012 (before he moved here).

In this sentence, should I say "had lived" and omit the "before he moved here" part?

or

Prior to his move, I know he had lived in A from 2011 to 2012.

Or should I just change everything to simple past?

I first met him in New York in 2011 and we became friends. I don't know where he lived before living in New York, but I know the fact that he lived in New York prior to his move to here, which took place in 2012.

This sentence sounds so wordy, so I was wondering if I can just use "had lived" to stress m point that I can assume that he lived in New York before moving "here". I heard a friend use "had lived" but couldn't quite figure out the correct usage.

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    If you want to use the simple past, change the sentence to this: I know that he lived in A before he moved to B last year. Eliminate all that verbosity. Words that do no work provide the brain with cerebral lard & permanently damage the fingertips.
    – user264
    May 22, 2013 at 5:55
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    You can also omit year in "from year 2011 to 2012": There isn't any possibility of confusion.
    – apaderno
    May 22, 2013 at 7:48

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The responses in the comments seem to me sufficient to constitute an answer, so I'm posting this to clear the record:

If you want to use the simple past, change the sentence to this: I know that he lived in A before he moved to B last year. Eliminate all that verbosity. Words that do no work provide the brain with cerebral lard & permanently damage the fingertips. – A since-departed (and lamented) user, Bill Franke

You can also omit year in "from year 2011 to 2012": There isn't any possibility of confusion. – kiamlaluno

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