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I wrote

In this formula, the number of nodes is multiplied to (P + A), because each node must be checked against the list of anchors, and if it matches any of them, a pattern must be retrieved from the list of patterns.

Could it be written as

In this formula, the number of nodes is multiplied to (P + A) because for each node it (the node) must be checked against the list of anchors, and if it matches any of them, a pattern must be retrieved from the list of patterns.

  • The meaning is different. What do you mean by "it" in the second sentence, please explain. – Victor Bazarov Sep 5 '15 at 12:12
  • @VictorBazarov by "it" I mean the "the node" – Ahmad Sep 5 '15 at 12:32
  • If it's the number of nodes that should be checked against the list of anchors then it's ok, but then the first one would be wrong. If it's the node itself that should be checked against the list of anchors, then it's wrong, and the first one is ok. – kos Sep 5 '15 at 12:54
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First, when describing the action of multiplication (arithmetic), like N*M, we usually say "N is multiplied by M", not "to M".

Second, in the second sentence the phrase "because for each node the node must be checked ..." seems to contain unnecessary repetition (yes, it was I who replaced the 'it' with "the node", and no, the repetition is not due to that, the repetition exists even with the "it" in place).

A simpler way to say what I believe you are trying to say, is

In this formula, the number of nodes is multiplied by (P + A), to show that each node is checked against the list of anchors, and if a match is found, a pattern must be retrieved from the list of patterns.

  • Thank you, your sentence is great, however I just thought if there is a normal sentence with "for each" or not?! – Ahmad Sep 5 '15 at 16:19
  • If you drop 'because', then 'for' can supply the necessary function: "multiplied by (P+A), for each node must be checked..." : this is the same use of 'for' as in "I ask for I know not..." ("I ask because I know not..."). But it's a bit outdated, bookish. – Victor Bazarov Sep 5 '15 at 17:15

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