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I saw a sentence like:

"Have you ever felt done by blablablah?"

What does it mean?

  • I don't suppose it was "hard done by", by any chance? – Nathan Tuggy Sep 6 '15 at 7:54
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    I can think of a couple different things that it might mean, but I'd want more context besides "blablablah" before I'd venture a guess. – J.R. Sep 6 '15 at 8:13
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    You might take a look at the phrases done in and done for. Whether they might work depends on blablablah. – user3169 Sep 6 '15 at 17:35
  • I lost the website I found it from.but I found out another similar example wording like"i felt impelled to go on speaking". I think it is also about the case I mentioned above.so could you explicate it? – 오준수 Sep 7 '15 at 6:49
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    I can't see any connection between "felt done by" and "felt impelled to go on speaking" (other than the use of "felt"). – James Random Apr 28 at 20:19
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Done, on its own, can mean tired or exhausted.

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/done#Adjective

It can also mean prosecuted, as in "He was done for shoplifting". This is a bit slangy, though.

But I've never seen it used as in the OP.

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"Done" has a large number of slang meanings. A lot of them could be relevant but without more context, it is hard to say.

One meaning of "done" is to be cheated, ripped off, or be robbed. (Maybe only in British English.) This could work with "feel done". So "have you ever felt done" would mean "have you ever felt cheated"

Done (adjective): 10. informal cheated; tricked

Collins Dictionary

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"done by", usually but not always in the phrase "hard done by", can mean "treated" or "used". "Hard done by" means "unfairly ill-treated". It is possible that the sentence

Have you ever felt done by...

was using this sense, but without more context one cannot be sure of that.

(I have seen "well-done by", but not often, and "doing well by" or "doing right by" more often.)

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