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I have the sentence below. This sentence can be split into separate parts, but I'm confused by the use of colons. I added the first colon, because I want to list my career goals:

  1. Become an expert.
  2. understand all data life cycles.

With the second colon I list life cycles:

  1. From mainframes
  2. To implemented software products

I'm guaranteed "XXX" is a place where I can achieve my career goals: become a big data expert and understand all data life cycles: from mainframes where data is stored to an implemented software products for a better life of business.

  • Thank you for accepting my answer, but a suggestion: leave the question open a couple of days: more people will look at it and you can get even better answers. – laureapresa Sep 6 '15 at 9:35
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    Not that you asked, but there are plenty of other problems with that sentence. "I'm guaranteed..." is wrong; I am guessing you meant "I am sure..." "become a big data expert" is ambiguous: an expert in big data, or a big expert in data? – Brian Hitchcock Sep 6 '15 at 10:02
  • "mainframes" and "implemented software products" are not types of lifecyvles; they are things, not processes. Also "an" calls for singular "product"—if you mean multiple "products", leave the "an" out. – Brian Hitchcock Sep 6 '15 at 10:06
  • "a better life of business" is not idiomatic. Businesses might have a lifecyvle, buy one would not say a business has a "better life". If you mean that you want to have a bettrr life, say "a bettrr life in business". – Brian Hitchcock Sep 6 '15 at 10:09
  • @BrianHitchcock thank of your suggestions. I have in mind "an expert in big data". Using "a better life of business" i have in mind about software for help in business (etc. exel). Using your suggestions I change my sentence to <br> 'become an expert in big data and understand all, from mainframes where data is stored physically to implemented software products for (help of business in daily jobs)(business daily jobs)' – Edgaras Karka Sep 6 '15 at 10:22
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I'd use the first colon because you are really listing your career goals, one after the other. However, I always find the use of multiple colons in one sentence ugly. I was taught this in primary school in my mother tongue and never shook it off.

The good thing is that you put "from... to..."; it's not a simple list, but I read it as a range of skills/life cycles and you want to be an expert from one end of the spectrum to the other. It can flow elegantly with the simple use of a comma

I'm guaranteed "XXX" is a place where I can achieve my career goals: become a big data expert and understand all data life cycles, from mainframes where data is stored to an implemented software products for a better life of business.

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