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My own example:

"I will get me metamorphosed in this tough life and eventually make me a man of quick parts"
"a lot of entomologist think metamorphosing these moth would take so long time"

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    While it's not incorrect to use "metamorphose" as a verb, it's definitely far more frequently used as a noun: "entomologists think this moth's metamorphosis would take a long time". In the moth example especially, I read the verb form as indicating that the entomologists actually controlled and directed the moth's changes, rather than simply observing them. – Dan Henderson Sep 8 '15 at 12:38
  • Actually,i dissent from your opinion..You would find it correct as a verb if you check the dictionary..this word also can be used as a verb.but it is just not that common...or am i wrong still? – 오준수 Sep 8 '15 at 16:30
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    It's not incorrect to use "metamorphose" as a verb means the same as You would find it correct as a verb if you check the dictionary. Likewise, it's definitely far more frequently used as a noun means the same as can be used as a verb.but it is just not that common. So there is no dissent; we are in agreement. – Dan Henderson Sep 8 '15 at 18:26
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I agree with Dan Henderson in his comment. So, I'll post this as a (community wiki) answer:

While it's not incorrect to use "metamorphose" as a verb, it's definitely far more frequently used as a noun: "entomologists think this moth's metamorphosis would take a long time". In the moth example especially, I read the verb form as indicating that the entomologists actually controlled and directed the moth's changes, rather than simply observing them.

(In other words, we use metamorphose much less often than its noun: metamorphosis.)

Also, as he noted in another comment:

It's not incorrect to use "metamorphose" as a verb
(= You would find it correct as a verb if you check the dictionary.)

[I]t's definitely far more frequently used as a noun
(= it can be used as a verb, but it is just not that common.)

And that answers your question.

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    Metamorphose is a valid verb but you should consider it to have a strong scientific or academic connotation. Out of scientific contexts or specifically talking about butterflies or bugs it will sound jarring. I will get me metamorphosed in particular sounds extremely jarring unless you have a strong context in the listener's/reader's mind where it can be connected to bugs or butterflies, and even then, it will still sound weird. – LawrenceC Feb 23 '16 at 21:38
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You can use 'metamorphosing' as a verb in both the sentences, so yes, you can use it.

However, the sentences can be written in a better way.

IMO -

I'll metamorphose myself in this....
A lot of entomologists think that metamorphosing these mothS ....

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