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I have heard a sentence saying "The seminar now will take place a week on Tuesday"

Does this mean the seminar will take place from next Tuesday?

Could anyone explain grammatically how that is correct?

Thank you for your help!

3

I have never heard that expression in the U.S. Neither have I encountered "The seminar will take place Tuesday week." The most common way of saying it here would be "The seminar will take place a week from Tuesday."

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2

It means the seminar will take place seven days after the next Tuesday. Assuming it was said today, it would mean Tuesday 22nd September.

I can't explain the grammar behind it because it's a standard phrase (in British English, anyway). You'll find the definition in the Oxford Dictionary under Phrases.

a week on ——
Seven days after the specified day or date:
‘we’ll be back a week on Friday’

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2

In British English you have to be careful with this phrase as the exact date referred to can vary, in my experience, between the North and South of England, which causes awful difficulties even for native speakers who are not from the locality.

As correctly stated by @ssav the dictionary definition shows:

a week on ——
Seven days after the specified day or date:
‘we’ll be back a week on Friday’

The ambiguity is which Tuesday the 7 days are counted from! Some dialect versions assume it is the Tuesday from the current week, even if that means a previous day and some counting from the next Tuesday. This means the phrase can be interpreted a week differently in different regions. This causes some people to ask for clarification which Tuesday!

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1

Personally I think that's bad phrasing (although it does get the point across), I think a better way of saying "A week from this Tuesday" is:

"The seminar will take place a week from Tuesday" or even

"The seminar will take place Tuesday week"

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0

It is a phrase that would confuse almost all American English speakers, but apparently well understood (and widely used?) in British English. As a native speaker of AmEnglish, I can guess that it means "next Tuesday". Or maybe "a week after next Tuesday". That is why it is confusing unless you are a native BrEnglish speaker.

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