3

I'm looking for a formal way to request for updated information (I call it "seeking the updated things") in business email writing.

I'm thinking when you ask for information, you are actually seeking the updated things. So, is it okay to leave "updated" in these sentences?

May I know if there is any (updated) information?

Is there any (updated) information?

Please let us know if you have (updated) information on this issue.

Also, can anyone give me some good examples of professional business email writing?

4

I do agree with the answer from Mowser, 'updated' would generally work. But something more natural would be 'new.'

Is there any new information?

May I know if there is any new information?

Please let us know if there is any new information on this issue.

Side note: the second one sounds a little stilted. I would just say:

Please let me know if there is any new information.

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How in the world can one possibly answer this question without more context? Can you pull the information you currently have from a database and stick it in a mail merge? For example, if I sent a semiannual email to my employees or customer base, asking for an update of demographic information, and I could use my database, I might make a template like this:

Dear user.firstname:

We have the following demographic information about you in our records:

data dump

If any of this information has changed, please reply to this email with updated information.

The most important point here is that you can't ask people for updated information unless you have a reasonable expectation that they already know exactly what information you currently have! If you do have that reasonable expectation, you can use forms of the verb "update" in any way you want. Or you can use alternative terms if they are closer to what you need to know.

2

It depends on context.

Context is everything in this case. If being "updated" is a typically important or relevant feature of the particular type of "information" the writer is referencing (e.g., flight arrival times), I would suggest you leave "updated" in the sentence.

However, it is fine to omit the word "updated" in either case.

protected by J.R. Feb 27 '17 at 17:03

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