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We do not always know what products are there on the market.
We do not always know what products are there available.

Are these two sentences grammatically correct and what does "there" in the sentences mean? Thanks a lot. If I rewrite the sentence as "We do not always know what products are there avilable on the market",is it acceptable or grammatical? Thank you again.

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  • A good friend is someone who is always there for you ;) Commented Sep 15, 2015 at 6:46
  • In such cases, 'there' is a superfluous word. The word is used just to emphasize with no 'additional information' served.
    – Maulik V
    Commented Sep 15, 2015 at 8:12
  • it is indicative of the 'existence' of something at(in) some location/point/reality. "We do not always know what products are there in the market." (What PRODUCTS [something] are in the MARKET[somewhere]) Remember that in Mathematics/Logic, resulting sets are explained with the use of the opening phrase, "There exist(s)..." (i.e., given set A and set B, there exist(s)...)
    – shin
    Commented Sep 15, 2015 at 8:14

2 Answers 2

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IMO, in both these sentences, 'there' is used as an adverb of place.

However, the second sentence can be reworded like this:

We do not always know what products are available there (OR on the market).

The first sentence seems an extension to the above sentence, and in both these sentence 'there' shows location/point.

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I think they're not. I would write them in the following way.

We do not always know which products there are on the market.

We do not always know which products are available.

Examples:
"There are three products on the market."
"Are there products on the market?"
"Is there that product on the market?"
"There is a product in the market."

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  • Where is 'there' in the second sentence?
    – Rucheer M
    Commented Sep 15, 2015 at 8:37
  • In the second sentence it is unnecessary: "we do not always know which products there are available" is redundant in my opinion. Commented Sep 15, 2015 at 8:40

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